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Social Work

SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Social Work Program is to prepare students for the beginning level of professional practice as social work generalists in a wide range of settings, with diverse populations, and with a special sense and appreciation for the peoples and institutions of West Virginia

Our undergraduate Social Work program has a long tradition of preparing students for beginning generalist practice in a unique and culturally diverse learning environment. The program has been fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) since 1975 and has graduated over 700 students serving in child welfare, mental health,veterans services, substance abuse, aging, healthcare, youth services, corrections, disabilities, schools and social justice settings. Many of our graduates have gone on to pursue advanced degrees at other universities throughout the country.
 

If you enjoy working with people and are looking for a profession that is interesting and fulfilling, you should consider Social Work as your career choice.

At right, you will also find a link to the Healthy Grandfamilies program, which is bringing much-needed education, resources and support to West Virginia's growing population of grandparents raising grandchildren. The program is a collaboration between the Department of Social Work and WVSU Extension Service, funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

We appreciate your visiting our website and encourage you to contact us for additional information.

The undergraduate Social Work Program at West Virginia State University (WVSU) has a long tradition of preparing students for beginning generalist practice in a unique and culturally diverse learning environment. The “Generalist Model of Social Work” provides assurance that professional social work skills, values, and knowledge can be applied in working in a wide range of settings with individuals,families, groups, organizations, and communities.
 

Social work is one of the oldest human service professions. It uses the social and behavioral sciences to understand and help individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities realize their full potential. Students in the social work program learn professional values, master a broad range of knowledge about individuals, social systems, human diversity, social policy, and generalist practice theory; and develop skills related to analysis and problem solving, communication, research and generalist practice. The program helps students to integrate theoretical material from the classroom with the practical supervised field experience of working directly with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
 

Social Work Program Goals
 

The primary goals of the program are to:
 

  1. Prepare the undergraduate student with the knowledge and skills necessary for baccalaureate level generalist social work practice in a wide range of settings with diverse populations. 
  2. Instill in students high standards of social work values and ethics throughout the curriculum. 
  3. Provide students with a broad understanding of the nature of human needs through a liberal arts foundation, which enriches student growth and provides an understanding useful for thinking critically about society, people and their problems, the expressions of culture, and a perspective on the ways social welfare programs address human needs. 
  4. Contribute to the University’s commitment to fostering cultural, social, and ethical growth in its students by a special emphasis on relationships between diverse peoples and their social environment and by instilling in students recognition and respect for the dignity and worth of client systems in reference to gender, race, religion, national origin, disabilities, and sexual preference. 
  5. Instill in students the habits and discipline conducive to lifelong learning and the ongoing enhancement of the skills necessary for successful professional growth and development in social work practice and provide them with a comprehensive foundation for graduate professional education in social work.
Program Accreditation

An important fact for you to know is that our program is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accrediting body for Social Work educational programs. This means potential employers anywhere in the country will recognize our program as having met the standards for quality and excellence set by CSWE. It also means our graduates are eligible for licensure as social workers in West Virginia and other states, depending on individual state laws. The Social Work program at West Virginia State University has been continually accredited by CSWE since 1975.


Affirmative Action Statement


West Virginia State University is an EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION institution and does not discriminate against any person because of race, sex, age, color, religion, disability, national or ethnic origin.
 


ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Summary of the Program’s Assessment Plan | Generalist Practice
 
All students are assessed using a minimum of two measures on their mastery of the nine competencies that comprise the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards of the Council on Social Work Education and any additional competencies programs may choose to add.  Summarize the program’s competency-based assessment plan.  Programs may add/delete rows to accurately reflect the number measures included in the data presented.
Assessment Measure #1: Comprehensive Exam
Dimension(s) assessed: Knowledge, Values, Skills, Cognitive and Affective Processes
When/where students are assessed: S WK 405 Social Work Practice III
Who assessed student competence: Dr. Kerri Steele, Dean
Outcome Measure Benchmark (minimum score indicative of achievement) for Competencies 1-9: 75%
Competency Benchmark (percent of students the program expects to have achieved the minimum scores, inclusive of all measures) for Competencies 1-9: 85%
Assessment Measure #2: Field Evaluation
Dimension(s) assessed: Behaviors
When/where students are assessed: S WK 406 Advanced Field Instruction
Who assessed student competence: Professor Lena Lambert, Field Director
Outcome Measure Benchmark (minimum score indicative of achievement) for Competencies 1-9: 3
Competency Benchmark (percent of students the program expects to have achieved the minimum scores, inclusive of all measures) for Competencies 1-9: 85%
 
Assessment Data Collected during the Academic Year (2022-2023)