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201. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
An introductory course concerned with the working of the economy as a whole. Development of the theories of consumption, investment, and equilibrium income; application of the theory to current macro economic problems; monetary and fiscal policy and its influence on economic activity.
 
202. PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
An introductory course concerned primarily with the functioning of specific parts of the economy. The theory of consumer behavior and firm behavior under varying degrees of competition; the determination of price in both product and resource markets. Application of the theory to current micro economic problems.
 
301. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
The course is a survey of the current and past theories of the macroeconomy and how stable it is. These theories could be explained using graphical, algebraic, and written analysis. Also the effects of the various policy views of each theory are considered, and each view's relation to the economy we observe is analyzed. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
302. INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
The course analyzes how consumers, firms, government, or any other economic units may make optimal decisions under various market conditions. Microeconomic theory is utilized to evaluate selected economic policies and practices of business firms and the government. Conditions for overall efficiency are also developed. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
305. ECONOMETRICS (3 credit hours)
This course develops skills to estimate economic relationships grounded in economic theory. Students will use statistical software for estimation. Basic concepts of statistics will be used. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202; B A 203.
 
306. PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION, AND FISCAL POLICY (3 credit hours)
Analysis of taxation and government expenditures. The impact of various levels of government on the local, state and national economies. Historical and current analysis of the role of fiscal policy on business cycles. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
308. MONEY, BANKING AND MONETARY THEORY (3 credit hours)
A survey of historical development of American monetary and banking institutions; analysis of contemporary monetary theory and policy and a critique of monetary problems and their alternative solutions; a review of the international monetary structure. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
310. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3 credit hours)
Problems of economic development facing the low income countries of the world. Topics include international trade, foreign aid, capital formation and the role of government in the industrialization process. Selected areas of the U.S. such as Appalachia will also be considered. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
320. LABOR ECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
Analysis of the theoretical and historical development of the American labor movement; collective bargaining, wage theory and the impact of union wage policy upon current economic and social problems. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
330. URBAN ECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
This course focuses on urban areas as unique places of production and consumption. The role of transportation costs in determining city location will be discussed and analysis will be developed to explain why cities are taller than the surrounding countryside. In addition to these location aspects of cities, such urban problems as poverty, crime, education, transportation, public finance and optimal city size will be examined in detail. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
340. CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC ISSUES (3 credit hours)
Reports and discussion of leading economic problems and issues. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of economics to real-world problems. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
399. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1 to 3 credit hours)
A junior level course designed for a topic of special current interest, including televised courses. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202 and/or consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.
 
401. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3 credit hours)
Survey of economic theory covering major schools of economic thought and the economic environment which produced them. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
406. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (3 credit hours)
A comparative study of the philosophical and ideological foundations of these systems ranging from capitalism to communism. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
409. MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
Application of selected mathematical principles to economics. Differential and integral calculus, matrix algebra, input-output analysis and linear programming will be applied to economic theory. Static, comparative static, and dynamic analysis will be considered. Prerequisite: ECON 201, 202 and MATH 101.
 
410. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
Factors affecting the flow of trade and balance of payments; international economic theory and application; trade controls and their influence on international economics. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
411. CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3 credit hours)
This course compares neoclassical economics with a selection of heterodox economic schools of thought. Economic methodology and sociology of economic science is emphasized. The methodological framework is applied to the social systems of capitalism and socialism. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
415. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
Application of microeconomic theory and techniques of analysis to make managerial decisions. This class provides a practical knowledge of demand estimation, linear programming, game, theory, pricing, and capital budgeting. Course includes learning and use of appropriate software. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
416. INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3 credit hours)
This course studies practical framework for understanding and conducting effective business and financial decision making by the multinational firms in an international context. This course meets the requirements for BA 416. Prequisite: ECON 201, 202, AND BA 313 OR ECON 410.

417. HEALTH ECONOMICS (3 credit hours)
Economic analysis of the dynamics of health care provision and consumption in the U.S. Discussion of health care costs, access, legislations, and international comparison of health care systems are included.  Prequisite: ECON 201 and 202.
 
420. SENIOR SEMINAR  (3 credit hours)
This course is the capstone of the undergraduate economics experience, and it integrates the economics core. The student will select a research topic, construct a model or literary framework, and apply it to the problem. A baccalaureate test of the knowledge and proficiency in the economics core will be administered as part of student assessment. Prerequisite: ECON 201, 202, 301, 302, 305, 306, and 308.
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